Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/7295
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorİkizer, Gözde-
dc.contributor.authorKarancı, Ayşe Nuray-
dc.contributor.authorGül, Ervin-
dc.contributor.authorDilekler, İlknur-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-11T15:56:18Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-11T15:56:18Z-
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.issn2000-8198-
dc.identifier.issn2000-8066-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/20008198.2021.1872966-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/7295-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A worldwide health threat, the COVID-19 pandemic, has highlighted the need to focus on its mental health impact. However, literature on mental health effects including post-traumatic consequences of the pandemic is scarce. Objective: The current study examined post-traumatic stress (PTS), growth (PTG), and depreciation (PTD) during the pandemic, and explored factors associated with these mental health outcomes in an adult community sample from Turkey. Method: A total of 685 participants responded to an online survey that gathered data on sociodemographic characteristics, financial loss during the pandemic, time spent at home and frequency of social media use, perception of COVID-related risks, stress, and event-related rumination. Data analysis included correlation and regression analyses. Results: Results showed that PTS, PTG, and PTD were positively correlated with each other. Younger age and being single were associated with higher PTS and PTD, and lower education levels predicted all three outcomes. Experiencing financial loss during the pandemic, more frequent social media use to follow COVID-related news and posts, and longer time spent at home during the pandemic were associated with higher PTS. Anticipating financial risks during the pandemic were associated with all outcomes while anticipating health-related risks due to COVID-19 and perceived stress levels predicted PTS and PTD but not PTG. Both intrusive and deliberate rumination were associated with higher levels of PTS and PTD, and PTG was predicted solely by deliberate rumination. Moreover, provisional PTSD was indicated in 47.9% of the participants. Membership to the provisional PTSD group was predicted by age, level of education, time spent on social media, anticipating COVID-19-related health risks, perceived stress, and event-related rumination. Conclusions: The current study provides empirical evidence for the short-term post-traumatic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and related factors, which can help to guide mental health services during the pandemic.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltden_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Psychotraumatologyen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectPost-traumatic stressen_US
dc.subjectpost-traumatic growthen_US
dc.subjectpost-traumatic depreciationen_US
dc.subjectperceived stressen_US
dc.subjectevent-related ruminationen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.titlePost-traumatic stress, growth, and depreciation during the COVID-19 pandemic: evidence from Turkeyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentFaculties, Faculty of Science and Literature, Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.departmentFakülteler, Fen Edebiyat Fakültesi, Psikoloji Bölümütr_TR
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.authorid0000-0002-9231-8141-
dc.authorid0000-0003-3567-5991-
dc.authorid0000-0003-1632-3851-
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000620630900001en_US
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85101220947en_US
dc.institutionauthorİkizer, Gözde-
dc.institutionauthorKarancı, Ayşe Nuray-
dc.institutionauthorDilekler, İlknur-
dc.identifier.pmid34025916en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/20008198.2021.1872966-
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.dept07.04. Department of Psychology-
crisitem.author.dept07.04. Department of Psychology-
Appears in Collections:Psikoloji Bölümü / Department of Psychology
PubMed İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / PubMed Indexed Publications Collection
Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection
Show simple item record

CORE Recommender

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
checked on Sep 23, 2022

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

14
checked on Sep 24, 2022

Page view(s)

16
checked on Oct 3, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in GCRIS Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.