Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/8247
Title: Immune mechanisms in human Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari: Sarcoptidae) infestations
Authors: Gazi, Umut
Taylan-Özkan, Ayşegül
Mumcuğlu, Kosta Y.
Keywords: adaptive immune response
innate immune response
Sarcoptes scabiei
scabies
Blood Mononuclear-Cells
Serum Ige
Antibody-Response
Crusted Scabies
Mast-Cells
Skin
Immunoglobulin
Expression
Identification
Disease
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Wiley
Abstract: Scabies is a parasitic infestation of human and animal skin caused by different strains of the itch mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared scabies in human as a neglected tropical disease, and today over 200 million people worldwide are affected. The two most commonly reported clinical manifestation of the condition are ordinary (OS) and crusted scabies (CS). CS, which can lead to fatal consequences due to secondary bacterial infections, is mostly observed in immunocompromised subjects but can also, although rarely, be detected in immunocompetent individuals. Innate and adaptive immune system components are involved in protection and pathogenesis of scabies, although with some differences between OS and CS. While the cutaneous immune response is dominated by CD4(+) T-cells in OS, it is mainly mediated by CD8(+) T-cells in CS. The two clinical conditions also differ in CD4(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses with mixed T(H)1/T(H)2 (protective) and T(H)2/T(H)17 (non-protective) immunoprofiles in OS and CS, respectively. Moreover, the development of CS is associated with early immunosuppression that is followed by deleterious immune response to uncontrolled mite proliferation. However, the immune response to scabies still needs further attention due to inconsistent results in the literature. The aim of this study is to attract more attention to this area by summarizing the current literature on innate and adaptive immune responses triggered against S. scabiei mites.
URI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pim.12900
https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/8247
ISSN: 0141-9838
1365-3024
Appears in Collections:PubMed İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / PubMed Indexed Publications Collection
Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
Temel Tıp Bilimleri Bölümü / Department of Basic Medical Sciences
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection

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