Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/9001
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dc.contributor.authorKowal M.-
dc.contributor.authorSorokowski P.-
dc.contributor.authorPisanski K.-
dc.contributor.authorValentova J.V.-
dc.contributor.authorVarella M.A.C.-
dc.contributor.authorFrederick D.A.-
dc.contributor.authorZumárraga-Espinosa M.-
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-30T19:25:49Z-
dc.date.available2022-11-30T19:25:49Z-
dc.date.issued2022-
dc.identifier.issn1090-5138-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2022.08.003-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/9001-
dc.description.abstractPeople across the world and throughout history have gone to great lengths to enhance their physical appearance. Evolutionary psychologists and ethologists have largely attempted to explain this phenomenon via mating preferences and strategies. Here, we test one of the most popular evolutionary hypotheses for beauty-enhancing behaviors, drawn from mating market and parasite stress perspectives, in a large cross-cultural sample. We also test hypotheses drawn from other influential and non-mutually exclusive theoretical frameworks, from biosocial role theory to a cultural media perspective. Survey data from 93,158 human participants across 93 countries provide evidence that behaviors such as applying makeup or using other cosmetics, hair grooming, clothing style, caring for body hygiene, and exercising or following a specific diet for the specific purpose of improving ones physical attractiveness, are universal. Indeed, 99% of participants reported spending >10 min a day performing beauty-enhancing behaviors. The results largely support evolutionary hypotheses: more time was spent enhancing beauty by women (almost 4 h a day, on average) than by men (3.6 h a day), by the youngest participants (and contrary to predictions, also the oldest), by those with a relatively more severe history of infectious diseases, and by participants currently dating compared to those in established relationships. The strongest predictor of attractiveness-enhancing behaviors was social media usage. Other predictors, in order of effect size, included adhering to traditional gender roles, residing in countries with less gender equality, considering oneself as highly attractive or, conversely, highly unattractive, TV watching time, higher socioeconomic status, right-wing political beliefs, a lower level of education, and personal individualistic attitudes. This study provides novel insight into universal beauty-enhancing behaviors by unifying evolutionary theory with several other complimentary perspectives. © 2022 The Authorsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, FCT: SFRH/BD/126304/2016, UID/PSI/03125/2021; Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, UTAR: 6401/0019; Narodowe Centrum Nauki, NCN: 2019/33/N/HS6/00054; National Research University Higher School of Economics, ???en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPatrícia Arriaga was supported by the FCT through funds from the research center UID/PSI/03125/2021. Anabela C. Santos was supported by the FCT through funds from a PhD grant SFRH/BD/126304/2016.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDmitry Grigoryev was supported by the Basic Research Program at the National Research University Higher School of Economics ( HSE University ).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article:, This work is the result of the research project funded by the National Science Center, Poland (2019/33/N/HS6/00054). Dmitry Grigoryev was supported by the Basic Research Program at the National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE University). Dmitrii Dubrov was supported by the Basic Research Program at HSE University, RF. Patrícia Arriaga was supported by the FCT through funds from the research center UID/PSI/03125/2021. Anabela C. Santos was supported by the FCT through funds from a PhD grant SFRH/BD/126304/2016. Kavitha Nalla Muthu and Chee-Seng Tan were supported by the UTAR Research Centre Excellence Award 2019 – CAP (6401/0019) from the Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman. The authors would like to thank the following scholars for their help with the translation: Christin-Melanie Vauclair Melanie, Cátia Carvalho, Diogo Lamela, Elena Piccinelli, and Isabel Pinto (Portuguese), Stanislava Stoyanova (Bulgarian), Vira Hrabchuk and Anne MacFarlane (Ukrainian). The authors would also like to thank the following organizations and individuals for their help with organizing data collection in El Salvador: the Escuela de Comunicación Mónica Herrera, Directora Nicole Paetz, asistente María Erlinda Ávalos, Diego Infante, and Gabriela Quintanilla.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKavitha Nalla Muthu and Chee-Seng Tan were supported by the UTAR Research Centre Excellence Award 2019 – CAP (6401/0019) from the Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work is the result of the research project funded by the National Science Center, Poland (2019/33/N/HS6/00054).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEvolution and Human Behavioren_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectAppearanceen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary theoryen_US
dc.subjectMating market perspectiveen_US
dc.subjectPathogen stressen_US
dc.subjectSelf-modificationen_US
dc.subjectSocial media usageen_US
dc.titlePredictors of enhancing human physical attractiveness: Data from 93 countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000898669000001en_US
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85137282665en_US
dc.institutionauthorIkizer, Gözde-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2022.08.003-
dc.authorscopusid57208683642-
dc.authorscopusid23098130400-
dc.authorscopusid37089331700-
dc.authorscopusid24475979400-
dc.authorscopusid54394452700-
dc.authorscopusid8317030200-
dc.authorscopusid53879425100-
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US
dc.ozel2022v3_Editen_US
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeArticle-
Appears in Collections:Psikoloji Bölümü / Department of Psychology
Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection
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